Commemoration
&
Remembrance
Oppression

Oskar (Oscar) Adler

born 30.08.1879 Carlsbad
d. 14.10.1936 Karlsbad

DGIM Honorary Member 1920 – 1936

The private lecturer at the German University in Prague and doctor in the house "Drei Mohren" on Karlovy Vary's market square, died at the age of 57 after a long illness in the fall of 1936. He was thus no longer subject to direct persecution by the National Socialists, which began in Karlovy Vary latest with its annexation by the German Reich on October 1, 1938.

Adler's father was the Karlovy Vary chemist Wilhelm Adler. He and his wife Charlotte had three sons, Oskar, Ernst and Rudolf. Adler successfully passed his school-leaving examination in Prague and then studied medicine in Berlin and Prague.1 He was enrolled at the Medical Faculty of the German University in Prague from 1899 to 1905.2 He was approved in 1904.3 He received his doctorate in 1905 under Rudolf Fick, director of the Anatomical Institute, who had just come to Prague from Leipzig. He was an assistant at the Medical Clinic of the German University in Prague from 1908 to 1914. During this time (1913) he qualified as professor and became a private lecturer in "Spezielle Pathologie und Therapie der inneren Krankheiten".4

Adler presented papers at the DGIM congress in Wiesbaden in 1922 and 1925.5 He presented his greatest scientific achievement, the development of the benzidine test for the detection of blood in the stool, together with his brother Rudolf in 1904.6 In addition, he worked on sugar metabolism, melanosarcomas, and the microbiology of mineral springs, among other topics.7

In the opening address of the 1937 DGIM Congress in Wiesbaden, Chairman Richard Siebeck [Hyperlink] mentioned Oskar Adler's death, even though the Nazis did not deem him worthy of remembering, as he wa a Jew.8


References

Registry book of doctors of the German Charles-Ferdinand University in Prague/German University in Prague (1904-1924), Collection No. 187, Inventory No. 3, p. 15.See database Students of Prague Universities (1882-1945).See Georg Riha (ed.), Medical Yearbook for the Czechoslovak Republic, Prague 1935, p. 37.Registry book of doctors of the German Charles-Ferdinand University in Prague/German University in Prague (1904-1924), Collection No. 187, Inventory No. 3, p. 15 (is.cuni.cz See also Solomon R. Kagan, Jewish Medicine, Boston 1952, p. 333.Oskar Adler, Über melanotische Pigmente, in Verhandlungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Innere Medizin, 34 (1922), pp. 161-165; Oskar Adler, Abortive Treatment of Gallstone Disease, in Verhandlungen des Deutschen Gesellschaft für Innere Medizin, 37 (1925), p. 429.See Oskar Adler, Rudolf Adler, Über das Verhalten gewisser organischer Verbindungen gegenüber Blut mit besonderer Berücksichtigung des Nachweises von Blut, in: Zeitschrift für Physiologische Chemie 41 (1904), pp. 59-67.See Rudolf Adler/Oscar Adler, Die Fällbarkeit des Fruchtzuckers durch Bleiessig im Harn, in: Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft 38 (1905), pp. 116-1165; Rudolf Adler/Oscar Adler, Über primäre aromatische Arsinsäuren, in: Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft 41 (1908), pp. 931-934 (as a research site, ibid, p. 934 is given as "Karlsbad, Chemisches Laboratorium Wilhelm Adler"); Oscar Adler, Über Verbindungen des Benzidins mit Zuckern, nebst einem Anreicherungsverfahren für Fructose, in: Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft 42 (1909), pp. 1742-1746 (the Pharmakologisches Institut der Deutschen Universität Prag is given as the research site in ibid. p. 1742); O. Adler/W. Wiechowski, Melanin-Bildung aus organischen Stoffen, in: Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft 55 (1922), pp. 3030-3038. See also Kagan, Medicine, p. 333.R.[ichard] Siebeck, Eröffnungsrede, in: Verhandlungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Innere Medizin, 49 (1937), pp. 1-8, p. 6.

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